Latest News

Clarification on Practice for MSK Practitioners

27/11/2020

This guidance clarifies the law when owners wish a MSK Practitioner to assess their animal and when a Vet refers an animal to a MSK Practitioner. The following Guidance has been approved by the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) Standards Committee and will be circulated among the veterinary profession: a) Musculoskeletal therapists are part of the vet-led team. Animals cared for or treated by musculoskeletal therapists must be registered with a veterinary surgeon. Musculoskeletal therapists carry out a range of manipulative therapies, including physiotherapy, osteopathy and chiropractic therapy. b) As per the Veterinary Surgery (Exemptions) Order 2015, remedial treatment by ‘physiotherapy’ requires delegation by a veterinary surgeon who has first examined the animal. 'Physiotherapy' is interpreted as including all kinds of manipulative therapy. It therefore includes osteopathy and chiropractic but would not, for example, include acupuncture or aromatherapy. It is up to the professional judgment of the veterinary surgeon to determine whether and when a clinical examination should be repeated before musculoskeletal treatment is continued. c) The delegating veterinary surgeon should ensure, before delegation, that they are confident that the musculoskeletal therapist is appropriately qualified and competent; indicators can include membership of a voluntary register with associated standards of education and conduct, supported by a disciplinary process. As the RCVS does not regulate musculoskeletal therapists it cannot recommend specific voluntary registers. d) Musculoskeletal maintenance care for a healthy animal, for instance massage, does not require delegation by a veterinary surgeon. However, the animal must still be registered with a veterinary surgeon. Maintenance should cease and the owner of the animal should be asked to take their animal to a veterinary surgeon for clinical examination at the first sign that there may be any underlying injury, disease or pathology. Alternatively, the musculoskeletal therapist may ask the client for formal consent to disclose any concerns to the veterinary surgeon that has their animal under their care. This clarification has come about as a result of RAMP Council consultation with DEFRA and the RCVS around clarification for veterinary consent for Competition and Maintenance Care. To reiterate, the only difference to current practice is in point d). An animal declared healthy by the owner, in cases where care is given to maintain good health and optimise competition performance, can be seen without specific Veterinary referral with the caveats stated. This covers the areas of Maintenance care and Competition care only. This clarification will ease the current legal grey area and hope it will improve communication between MSK Practitioners and the Veterinary Profession. Any suspected pathology must be reported back to the animals registered vet immediately.

Read More...

Working within Government Guidelines

03/11/2020

Following Government guidelines we move back into a lockdown in England and restrictions within other parts of the country. We expect that many practitioners have found ways to work while adhering to the guidelines of social distancing, PPE and risk assessments to date but we now need to be aware of the increased restrictions. In the absence of further restrictions advised by the RCVS we would just reiterate that each practitioner must continue to risk assess cases on an individual basis whilst maintaining safe working practice within the National restrictions/guidance. As a reminder these are the current guidelines for RAMP registrants: 1. Animals with demonstrable pain and welfare issues should be seen, these may include all pathologies. 2. A pre-visit risk assessment and telephone call is essential. Gain as much information prior to the visit as possible to minimise contact time. If appropriate, would the use of an oral sedative, supplied by the clients' vet to the client, mitigate risk? Do you have access to a responsible ‘safe’ handler that can attend with you? 3. No appointments should be made with anyone who has Covid symptoms or who is in close contact with anyone with Covid symptoms. There must be a 14-day quarantine period for them, prior to seeing them. Consider the suitability of wearing a mask to reduce the risk of the practitioner spreading Covid between yards/clients. Consider asking owners/handlers to wear masks to reduce the risk of transmission to the practitioner. 4. If you have symptoms do not treat, get tested, and await a clear result, prior to seeing any clients. 5. Animals with owners in the vulnerable categories should not be treated in the normal way. Try to see if any other approach other than face to face can be used. 6. Small animals should be seen in a clinic setting, (physio or vet) rather than home visits if possible, as cleanliness, disinfection and biosecurity are easier to control. If home visits are necessary, ensure that no other pets/family etc are present. In a clinic setting explore the possibility of treatment without owner present. Risk asses home visits very carefully. 7. Yard visits- Risk assess individual setups. As a professional you will be aware of the situations, and risks, at each of your regular yards. Some may be relatively ‘safe’, others less so. The decision to attend a client should be dictated by the risk assessment. 8. Home/yard visits, ask for gates to be opened and closed for you to minimise touching surfaces. No loose dogs/cats around that could transmit virus via petting, ensure animal is ready and waiting for you (ie no putting on headcollars, leads etc and unnecessary handling of owners equipment), carry your own soap and towels to wash between visits and ask for a fresh bucket of warm water or easy access to sink to wash. Accept no refreshments. 9. Other considerations, can the animal be left tied up with the owner at an appropriate distance? If not, are there any other strategies to improve safety and appropriately handle and restrain the animal. Is this a safe approach for you, the client and the animal? 10. Is this animal safe to treat with these restrictions in place? 11. All visits should be risk assessed and the results documented. Including those where treatment is refused and the reasons why, with documented details of the explanation to the client. 12. Only see regular clients if possible, this reduces the risk to you and the clients and eases the process of risk assessment. Do not ‘poach’ another practitioners’ clients. 13. For new referrals of non-regular clients have a close liaison with the vet re the risks and set up of the treatment environment, not just the clinical condition. 14. Payment- attempt to remove the need to handle payments. Request payment by BACS/credit card/paypal. This is not an exhaustive list of all the possible considerations and scenarios but some guidance. Professional judgement and expert opinion should be used at all stages to ensure the practitioners and the client’s safety while also minimising the risks of spreading Covid 19. The professional judgement of the practitioner, based on a thorough risk assessment, should always lead the decision as to whether it is safe to attend and treat an animal. Remember that owners should list practitioners as healthcare workers for the track and trace requirements including QR codes.

Read More...

Welcome to the new RAMP website

06/09/2020

Welcome to our new RAMP website, we hope you will find it informative and it will help you find out more about RAMP, if you want to join us as a Registrant or an Educational Partner, if you are a fellow Professional or an animal owner, there is some information for everyone. Use the Register page to find a RAMP Practitioner for your animal or to refer an animal, safe in the knowledge RAMP are doing all the hard work scrutinising the Practitioners that are on the Register to make sure they achieve and maintain our Gold Standard Practice. We would love to know what you think and if the new website is giving you the information you need so please Contact us with any suggestions or comments. Even if you already know about RAMP have a flick through the pages, there are some lovely new images of our furry, feathered, and hairy friends.

Read More...

Interested in joining the RAMP Council?

06/10/2020

The RAMP Council consists of three representatives from each of the Professions ie Chiropractic, Osteopathy and Physiotherapy, one small animal and one large animal Veterinary advisor and a lay person representing the public interest. If you would like to apply to join the RAMP Council, please register an interest with us via the contact us page or email info@rampregister.org . We have vacancies most years.

Read More...

To treat or not to treat, that has been the question!

06/10/2020

On the evening of March 23rd 2020 the Prime Minister announced the commencement of lockdown and within hours advice was coming from all quarters as to how different professions should react. The animal industry is incredibly complex and varied and the government could not possibly provide advice and legislation to cover every eventuality. This left Professional Associations and Regulators scrambling to interpret the rules and advise their members. In addition, many workers within the industry have no compulsory regulator and therefore no single source of information and help.

Read More...

Latest News

Clarification on Practice for MSK Practitioners

This guidance clarifies the law when owners wish a MSK Practitioner to assess their animal and when a Vet refers an animal to a MSK Practitioner. T...

Read More...
Working within Government Guidelines

Following Government guidelines we move back into a lockdown in England and restrictions within other parts of the country. We expect that many practi...

Read More...
Interested in joining the RAMP Council?

The RAMP Council consists of three representatives from each of the Professions ie Chiropractic, Osteopathy and Physiotherapy, one small animal and on...

Read More...